Raunchy, Rhythmic and Repetition: A Novel of Sounds

                                “When words fail, music speaks.” ~Shakespeare

Unknown.jpegFrom the music playing in the background while we grocery shop, to the music in our daily dose of Netflix, to that guy whistling next to you in line–music surrounds us daily.

But how about in our books, in the stories that we read?

Well, in most novels, no–there may not be many noticeable connections between books and music. Most all novels do, however, provide a kind of rhythm or tempo to help the story flow well. Many authors strive to focus more heavily on the aspect of ‘story,’ rather than the musical aspect of the writing.

In Fiston Mwanza Mujila’s novel, Well, in most novels, no–there may not be many noticeable connections between books and music. Many authors strive to focus more heavily on the aspect of ‘story,’ rather than the musical aspect of writing.

giphy.gif

In Fiston Mwanza Mujila’s novel, Tram 83, however,  it is clear that the structural aspects of the piece were more of a priority than the elements of a plot.

One of Mujila’s main goals for this novel was to weave the sounds of jazz throughout the stories of different character’s lives. The novel was composed of long solo passages with intense and highly detailed language.

For example, in one chapter Mujila wrote the word “mournful,” for almost the entirety of a page (p 181). The reason he chose to write in this way to portray something called tremolo, meaning the wavering effect in a musical tone. By using the word “mournful” over and over again in this one long passage, it mimics the rapid movement that is so commonly present in jazz.

Another example of when Mujila uses tremolo within his rapid movement that is so commonly present in jazz. Another example of when Mujila uses tremolo within his

By using the word “mournful” over and over again in

anigif_enhanced-5647-1407252145-10.gif

this one long passage, it mimics the rapid movement that is so commonly present in jazz. Another example of when Mujila uses tremolo within his rapid movement that is so commonly present in jazz. Another example of when Mujila uses tremolo within his

Another example of when Mujila uses tremolo within his novel is when he writes long and highly detailed lists. The lists display this musical rhythm because while reading them you can practically hear the tempo as it continues–getting faster and slower, and faster and slower.

One can see, after reading Mujila’s Tram 83, that music can play a huge part in a book, shaping the way in which one reads, and interprets information. By writing in this individualistic way, Mujila is able to better connect the reader with music, in a way that is entirely different from the other ways in which they retrieve music within their daily lives.


If you love music and beautifully detailed scenes, check out Fiston Mujila’s unique novel Tram 83.

.Unknown-1.jpeg


Images Cited:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/hannahjewell/problems-only-people-who-have-played-in-a-school-orchestra-w?utm_term=.mfeOmqVZYR#.mcB5PN94oA

http://okadabooks.com/book/about/tram_83_50_off/10581

http://www.sonnenschule.at/comenius/

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s